coochielatte:

I felt really cute today

coochielatte:

I felt really cute today

(via janemba)

Tags: mmmmm!

howtobeafuckinglady:

aminaabramovic:

Y’all acting like you weren’t 11 years old crying to Pink’s Family Portrait and Just Like A Pill? Y’all acting like Pink doesn’t have endless bops?

I wasn’t. I was listening to Beyoncé.

So was the rest of the world.

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 
Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?
Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.
The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.
Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections, 2009.20.148.

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 

Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?

Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.

The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections2009.20.148.

(via jessehimself)

ponderation:

The Senja glance by Daniel Korzhonov

ponderation:

The Senja glance by Daniel Korzhonov

(via jessehimself)

Tags: film

girlwiththemictattoo:

cashmerethoughtsss:

 

Beautiful !

There is power in calling our ancestor’s names.

(Source: beautymeetsbooty, via ttfkagb)

oamortemor:

white women with box braids is truly the ugliest look of the season

LOL she’s so sweet! She’s a bit malnourished (my mom and I picked her up from the side of the road as we were leaving my town of residence) and extremely anxious. I’ll be visiting a vet whenever my boyfriend gets into town because she needs some professional TLC!

LOL she’s so sweet! She’s a bit malnourished (my mom and I picked her up from the side of the road as we were leaving my town of residence) and extremely anxious. I’ll be visiting a vet whenever my boyfriend gets into town because she needs some professional TLC!

"

Pretty early on Mami decided that watching TV was beneficial; you could learn the language from it. She saw our young minds as bright, spiky sunflowers in need of light, and arranged us as close to the TV as possible to maximize our exposure. We watched the news, sitcoms, cartoons, Tarzan, Flash Gordon, Johnny Quest, The Herculoids, Sesame Street—eight, nine hours of TV a day, but it was Sesame Street that gave us our best lessons. Each word my brother and I learned we passed between ourselves, repeating over and over, and when Mami asked us to show her how to say it, we shook our heads and said, Don’t worry about it.

Just tell me, she said, and when we pronounced the words slowly, forming huge, lazy soap bubbles of sound, she never could duplicate them. Her lips seemed to tug apart even the simplest vowels. That sounds horrible, I said.

What do you know about English? she asked.

At dinner she’d try her English out on Papi, but he just poked at his pernil, which was not my mother’s best dish.

I can’t understand a word you’re saying, he said finally. It’s best if I take care of the English.

"

— junot diaz, “invierno,” this is how you lose her. a lot about the way he writes yunior’s mother, her loneliness, her sorrow, her love, her misery, really breaks me. this isn’t the worst thing that happens to her, in this book and certainly not if you’ve read drown, but there’s something about the subdued delicateness of this, her hope and quiet determination — later he talks of seeing her trying to mouth along with the tv — and the way her children put it down in the unthinking way of little kids, the way her husband shatters it, saying “the average woman can’t master English,” and how hard it is, also, yes, to learn a new language as an adult, by watching tv. she gives so much, and tries so hard, and suffers so quietly, and gets so little, so rarely. she’s part of the reason i don’t have an issue with diaz’s women — because the amount of humanity and history he endows her with, the empathy he extends to her, is so real and raw and painful, even when she’s on the periphery of the story, that you feel you are seeing her, a real person, not a construction. (via isabelthespy)

(via mizoguchi)

Tags: ;-;

unimpressed2chainz:

(beyonce voice) this is so crazy

I became a Dad over the weekend!

I became a Dad over the weekend!

aqqindex:

Sandro Chia

aqqindex:

Sandro Chia

(via lil-reina)

octoberspirit:

concept art - the prince of egypt, 1998, dreamworks animation

(via laiquendi)

aankhein:

Ranveer Singh for GQ India October 2013

aankhein:

Ranveer Singh for GQ India October 2013

(via unimpressed2chainz)